Will Biometrics Change the Way Your Business Accepts Payments?

By: Tim Prugar

Yes. Yes they will. But Payments will also change the way that Biometrics are leveraged for security. 

Technology has widened the chasm between small businesses and behemoth competitors like Amazon and Alibaba. This becomes most clear in the payments space, where smaller merchants struggle to process the volume and speed of transactions with the technological innovation that larger firms can afford. Small Business Trends took a look at the role biometrics plays in payments, and had an interesting takeaway:

Biometrics is not a Binary

Well, shouldn't be a binary anyway. Biometric identifiers don't get scored as "Correct" or "Incorrect" like knowledge-based identifiers do (Either "Appetite for Destruction" is your favorite album or it isn't!). Instead, authentication solutions look for the probability of a match based on a number of traits or signifiers - once that probability crosses a certain threshold, it's deemed a "match." 

The most effective biometric systems increase the probability that a biometric identifier is deemed a match by marrying that fingerprint or iris or what-have-you to other data signals. As the article points out, fingerprint biometrics can have their efficacy increased when paired with data signals like geolocation or Device ID. Similarly, Jack Ma made Alipay more secure by marrying the "Selfiepay" concept with smiling or nodding as a movement captcha. 

But what about Voice Biometrics?

Voice biometrics are an effective solution for authenticating callers and detecting fraud. Without additional data points, however, Voice Biometrics fails to meet its full potential. 

Here's what Voice Bio can leverage to get even smarter:

Dynamic Blacklists - If a call is coming from a known fraudulent number, a suspicious international number range, or a compromised account- why treat it as a basic customer call? Leverage this information, much of which can be accessed via API in near-real-time, to flag calls before they even reach you Biometric Authentication. 

Spoof - According to Next Caller's research, 94% of all fraudulent attacks on the call center leverage ANI spoofing as one of the methods to gain access.  Smart call centers use information about whether a call is spoofed to "green light" a call for an agent or flag that call for further scrutiny. 

Geolocation - Where should your caller be? If they're somewhere else - that's a solid indicator to at least take a second look at a call. 

Again, all of the above information is available in near-real-time, much faster than a Voice Biometric Authenticator can perform an analysis. 

The next major wave of Biometric Security won't be the implementation of the solutions, but the marrying of data that makes those solutions smarter. 

 

Tim Prugar is the Director of Customer Success at Next Caller. He can be reached at tim@nextcaller.com

Social Security: Social Media Phishing Attacks Are on the Rise, Here’s How You Can Protect Yourself

While phishing, or the practice of sending emails or making phone calls purporting to be from legitimate companies in an effort to get victims to reveal personal information is nothing new, fraudsters are increasingly turning to new channels to target victims. One such channel is social media.

Recently, a social media attacked carried out by Russian hackers was able to infiltrate the computer of a Pentagon official. And it didn’t take much for the hackers to find their way in; a simple link attached to a Twitter post advertising a vacation package was enough. Once the linked was clicked, the official’s computer was infected.

In November 2015, the State Department revealed that its 7,000 of its employees took the first step toward being compromised by clicking on a link that appeared in their social media feeds.

According to one report, social media phishing attacks increased 500% from beginning of 2016 to end of 2016. While that’s a scary statistic, the success rate of these types of attacks may be even more frightening.

Research published by the cybersecurity firm ZeroFOX found that 66% of spear phishing messages sent through social media sites were opened by their intended victims.

The reason for the increase in attacks on social media is rather simple. These attacks are targeting channels where users usually have a high-degree of trust. When you share something to your social network, or see a post from someone else, it’s unlikely that you screen the content for fraud potential.

With the number of attacks on the rise, and the vulnerability that social media channels presents making headlines, corporations and government agencies around the world are starting to realize the importance of educating and training staff on the dangers of social media fraud.

However, these attacks aren’t relegated to big organizations. Anyone who uses social media should be aware of the potential threats as well as the steps they can take to make it less likely that they will be hooked in a social media phishing attack.


To help, we’ve put together the following infographic: